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Workplace Safety Archives

Logging, fishing top list of most dangerous jobs in US

Not only are some industries more hazardous than others, but some are more dangerous than might be expected. Employers and employees in Texas should consider the list of the top 10 most dangerous jobs in the U.S., which were recently compiled based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The BLS, in its 2016 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, has also calculated the fatal work injury rate and the number of deaths in each industry listed.

Sanitation Workers Face Dangerous Work Conditions

Sanitation workers are a necessary part of the workforce, helping to keep cities in Texas and across the United States free of trash. While seeing a sanitation worker collecting trash from homes and business is a fairly common sight, it is not commonly known the dangers that many workers face in their jobs. According to the Solid Waste Association of North America, seven sanitation workers were killed during the first 10 days of 2018.

Five tips for a safer work environment

Employers in Texas may be wondering how to keep their employees safe, especially when they're being constrained by deadlines and the fast pace of the work environment. This is where five tips can come in handy. If employers follow these guidelines, they may find a decline in worker injury rates and an increase in employee morale, employee retention and business productivity.

How to guard against burn injuries at work

Those working in the oil and gas industry in Texas and throughout the country need to be aware of the risks related to fires. In 2017, three workers in Colorado were injured when an oilfield pipeline fire broke out. One of the men later died from his injuries. To protect against fire and other burn injuries, workers should be outfitted with proper flame-resistant (FR) clothing. In addition to keeping workers safe, it can offer financial protection for employers.

OSHA renews alliance with entertainment industry groups

According to a recent press release, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has renewed its partnership with the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) and United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT). This announcement is good news for Texas residents that work in the entertainment industry.

OSHA updates employers on crystalline silica rule

Texas general industry and maritime employers have until June 23 of this year to comply with much of the OSHA standard for respirable crystalline silica. Employers in the construction industry have had to comply with the rule since it went into effect in June 2016. The standard prohibits workers from being exposed to more than an average of 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air of crystalline silica for an eight-hour shift.

Workplace survey reveals need to update safety planning

When people go to work in Texas, they anticipate a routine experience, but if an emergency occurs at work, they might not know what to do. A survey conducted by Rave Mobile Safety collected answers from 530 people about emergency planning and workplace safety. The results showed a need to update emergency plans beyond fire drills and generational differences about awareness of workplace safety.

OSHA workplace safety staffing decreases in Trump's first year

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration may have a tougher job monitoring workplace safety in Texas due to a reported 4 percent decline in the number of OSHA inspectors across the country. Data reported from the Office of Personnel Management showed that the first year of the Trump Administration has seen a loss of 40 inspectors to attrition, who have not yet been replaced. OSHA's total health and safety inspection force was 1,000 workers strong as of 2016.

Plant shutdowns may require special worker training

Scheduled plant shutdowns provide Texas companies with opportunities to perform preventative maintenance and improve work processes. Shutdowns may in some cases increase plant productivity rates and lessen production downtime. Businesses that properly prepare for scheduled shutdowns are more effective at keeping projects moving and preventing workplace injuries. However, operators and management should be aware of some safety concerns unique to plant shutdown tasks.

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