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Workplace Safety Archives

How to guard against burn injuries at work

Those working in the oil and gas industry in Texas and throughout the country need to be aware of the risks related to fires. In 2017, three workers in Colorado were injured when an oilfield pipeline fire broke out. One of the men later died from his injuries. To protect against fire and other burn injuries, workers should be outfitted with proper flame-resistant (FR) clothing. In addition to keeping workers safe, it can offer financial protection for employers.

OSHA renews alliance with entertainment industry groups

According to a recent press release, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has renewed its partnership with the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) and United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT). This announcement is good news for Texas residents that work in the entertainment industry.

OSHA updates employers on crystalline silica rule

Texas general industry and maritime employers have until June 23 of this year to comply with much of the OSHA standard for respirable crystalline silica. Employers in the construction industry have had to comply with the rule since it went into effect in June 2016. The standard prohibits workers from being exposed to more than an average of 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air of crystalline silica for an eight-hour shift.

Workplace survey reveals need to update safety planning

When people go to work in Texas, they anticipate a routine experience, but if an emergency occurs at work, they might not know what to do. A survey conducted by Rave Mobile Safety collected answers from 530 people about emergency planning and workplace safety. The results showed a need to update emergency plans beyond fire drills and generational differences about awareness of workplace safety.

OSHA workplace safety staffing decreases in Trump's first year

The U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration may have a tougher job monitoring workplace safety in Texas due to a reported 4 percent decline in the number of OSHA inspectors across the country. Data reported from the Office of Personnel Management showed that the first year of the Trump Administration has seen a loss of 40 inspectors to attrition, who have not yet been replaced. OSHA's total health and safety inspection force was 1,000 workers strong as of 2016.

Plant shutdowns may require special worker training

Scheduled plant shutdowns provide Texas companies with opportunities to perform preventative maintenance and improve work processes. Shutdowns may in some cases increase plant productivity rates and lessen production downtime. Businesses that properly prepare for scheduled shutdowns are more effective at keeping projects moving and preventing workplace injuries. However, operators and management should be aware of some safety concerns unique to plant shutdown tasks.

Workplace safety at gig economy jobs

Workplace safety is important to the Texas workforce, including those who find themselves as part of the gig economy. The term "gig economy" is a broad term encompassing employment for an individual who is paid by the job they do as opposed to an hourly wage or yearly salary. These jobs can be performed online or in person.

How floor mats keep workers safe

The use of a mat may make it easier for Texas employers to keep their workers safe. One of the biggest benefits of mats is that they reduce the odds that someone may slip or trip while working. These types of accidents are among the most common in the workplace, and they cost companies $2.35 billion by themselves annually.

Protecting workers from arc flash explosions

It is important that Texas workers who are supposed to wear protective clothing for safety on the job do so at all times. In 2011, one electrician was severely injured when he worked without an arc flash suit. While doing a simple job, he encountered a problem. Since there was no main breaker, he had a choice between calling the power company with only half an hour left in his day or risking injury. The man chose to work on the unit without having the power shut off, and he was severely burned in an arc flash explosion.

New hard hats may prevent fatal injuries

Texas workers may benefit from new safety helmets that offer better protection in the event of falls. From 2003 to 2010, there were 2,210 fatal traumatic brain injuries resulting from construction industry accidents. Falls were the most common cause of such injuries, and those who were 65 and older had the highest death rates from TBI. Overall, there were 2.6 deaths for every 100,000 full-time equivalent workers.

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