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Posts tagged "Workplace Safety"

OSHA: employers must measure respiratory hazards

Under OSHA's Respiratory Protection Standard, all employers must evaluate respiratory hazards in the workplace before determining if their workers need respirators. This, as employers in Texas should know, was the decision that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit came to back in September 2019.

Dosimetry limits radiation risks to Texas workplace safety

Though low, the risks of radiation exposure are cumulative and severe. This is due in part to the fact that some types can cause negative health consequences 10 years or longer after exposure. Workers exposed to too much radiation may face an increased risk of several types of cancer and other negative health outcomes. El Paso employees who work around radiation sources will benefit from an understanding of how dosimetry can limit health risks.

Be aware of new EPA labeling requirements

Texas workers must often be concerned with the safe handling of hazardous materials while on the job. New guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency are designed to increase awareness and improve workplace safety. Becoming familiar with these guidelines is the best way to ensure materials are properly handled, stored and disposed of.

Keeping flaggers safe in work zones

Roadway work zones can be a dangerous place for flaggers, the ones who control the flow of traffic. Car crashes in work zones are nothing new in Texas. According to WorkZoneSafety.org, 2017 alone saw a total of 132 crash fatalities in roadway work zones. The Center for Construction Research and Training states that most of these crashes occur because of aggressive or speeding drivers.

Addressing the top five summer safety risks in construction

It's important for construction workers and their employers in Texas to be aware of the dangers of summer work. Below is a summary of the top five hazards in summer and what can be done to mitigate them. The list was compiled by a representative of Honeywell Industrial Safety.

OSHA highlights hazards of electrical industry

Engineers, electricians and others who work with electricity, especially with overhead lines and circuit assemblies, know that their industry is fraught with hazards. OSHA is now trying to raise awareness of these hazards so that both employers and employees in Texas and across the U.S. can work together to prevent serious injuries, illnesses and fatalities in this industry.

OSHA may revise Lockout/Tagout Standard, faces challenges

Workers in Texas, especially construction workers, know that some machines and equipment are liable to start up on their own or release stored-up energy, causing harm. This is why OSHA has developed what is called the Lockout/Tagout Standard. In May 2019, OSHA issued a Request for Information that would help modernize this standard in two ways.

Five steps to improving loading dock safety

Texas residents who work in manufacturing plants or warehouses are probably aware that the loading dock is the center of the action. For this reason, many accidents can take place around the loading dock. Slips, trips and falls, which account for more than 25% of workplace injuries every year, are especially common. By following five easy tips, though, employers can improve loading dock safety and reduce injury risk.

Workplace safety rules can also boost efficiency

Electrical accidents can cause serious injuries or even fatalities to Texas workers, which is one reason why a standard has been developed to help enhance workplace safety for employees dealing with electricity. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), charged with regulating safety on a federal level, requested industry itself develop a standard for electrical safety on the job. The result has become known as NFPA 70E and provides a framework for safer dealings with electricity at work.

Analyzing risk versus safety at work

Simply creating safety rules and procedures may not be enough for Texas companies to keep workers from getting hurt. Instead, it may be better to consider strategies that favor specific outcomes as opposed to completing tasks. It is also a good idea for companies to think of ways to remain productive without putting their employees in danger. Often times, companies will try to prioritize safety or production as opposed to focusing on how to do both.

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