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Posts tagged "workplace injury"

Workers' compensation insurance: the basics

In Texas, as in other states, most employers are required to carry workers' compensation insurance. In the event that employees are injured on the job, this insurance can cover a portion of the wages they lose as well as help them pay for their medical treatments. The insurance also covers funeral and burial expenses in case of a fatality. Death benefits can be paid out based on length of employment and annual income.

How job quality affects workers' health

Workers in Texas and other states may be interested in the results of a study that analyzed how the work that people do and the way it is organized influence their wealth and health. Employment relationships are complex and determine opportunities for advancement, work schedules, salary and protection against dangerous or adverse working conditions.

How to be proactive about worker safety

All Texas employees face the risk of getting hurt on the job, even if they work indoors. For those who work in office settings, they could experience neck, back or leg injuries if they don't sit at their desks properly. Ideally, individuals who work at their desks will make sure that their feet are firmly on the floor. Furthermore, their arms and back should be fully supported.

Study finds high vibration levels on some types of farm machinery

Anybody working with farm machinery in Texas must take proper precautions when working with such equipment. However, in some instances, it's the machinery itself that increases the risk of people sustaining work-related injuries. A study funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) found that whole-body vibration levels on 30 percent of the farm machinery tested exceeded the European Union's "action level" exposure limit for vibrations.

New cranking techniques could reduce injuries for Texas truckers

Millions of men and women across the country drive trucks for a living. They spend long hours behind the wheel as they carry loads from one city to another. Though federal laws limit how long and how far they can drive, injuries may still occur. The long hours they spend at work often lead to repetitive injuries and other damages that can cost thousands in medical expenses and lead to workers' compensation claims.

2017 sees slight dip in work-related fatalities

Texas residents who work in the transportation and construction industry should know that work-related deaths around the country declined from 5,190 in 2016 to 5,147 in 2017, though their industries still compose the majority of fatalities. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, in its annual report, states that the number is still high compared to the previous low of 4,551 in 2009.

Most contract worker electrocution deaths are in construction

After analyzing electrocution deaths among contract workers from 2012 to 2016, the National Fire Protection Association found that the majority of them are in the construction and extraction fields. Specifically, of the 13 percent of contract workers who died from electrocution, 68 percent were in those industries. Almost 30 percent of the deaths took place on construction sites. Contract workers in Texas will want to know what is causing this trend.

CDC identifies which jobs are riskier for carpal tunnel

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition in which a compressed median nerve causes pain, tingling, numbness and weakness in the hand or wrist. Anyone who engages in activities that put the hands and wrists in awkward postures or that involve forceful, repetitive tasks is at risk. Unfortunately, some Texas jobs have a high rate of CTS among employees.

DOL report criticizes OSHA data gathering practices

At least half of the severe injuries suffered each year by workers in Texas and around the country are not reported to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, according to a report released on Sept. 13 by the Department of Labor. The DOL's Office of Inspector General concludes in the report that changes made to OSHA's record-keeping rules, which were implemented in January 2015, have done little to address the issue.

Reducing slip, trip and fall hazards in the workplace

Slip, trips and falls that occur in Texas workplaces can result in serious injuries for workers. Because these types of injuries can have a major impact on an employee's health and ability to work, employers should be diligent in uncovering and preventing these types of injuries from occurring.

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